Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Book reviews: A Book of Brownies, by Enid Blyton

I am a big Enid Blyton fan and whenever I have a little time on my hands I always grab a book by her and escape into childhood.

A Book of Brownies is a classic example of Enid Blyton’s imagination and creativity as she tells the story of three very mischievous brownies named Hop, Jump and Skip who live in Crab Apple Cottage.

Due to their naughty behavior, they do not get invited to the party that is being hosted by the King of Fairyland in his grand castle. An old witch comes to their cottage and teaches them some magic tricks so that they can attend the party disguised as conjurers. Things go wrong as one of the magic tricks makes Princess Peronel disappear and they do not know the spell to get her back.

The angry King banishes the three brownies from Fairyland and forbids them to return until they have found their goodness. Their quest for their goodness takes them to exciting and dangerous places. First they are imprisoned by a bad wizard in the Cottage-Without-a-Door,

Then they meet the Red Goblin. They outwit him and rescue a mermaid who had been forced to work in his castle as a servant. Then they have a bad time in the Land of Giants and the Land of Clever People. They rescue a little girl and help her get back to the Land of Giggles.

Then they have an exciting adventure on the Green Railway and end up in prison in the Toadstool Town. They meet the dear old Saucepan Man who agrees to lead them to Witch land. Before he could do so, he is captured by the Dragon Bird who belongs to the Golden Dwarf. 

The three brownies risk their life and limb and save the Saucepan Man from being eaten. To their immense surprise, all their good deeds had been bottled up and they were able to find their goodness after all. They manage to find Princess Peronel but are captured by the evil witch.

In their last attempt to rescue the little princess, they give up their bottles of goodness to the witch who wants them for a powerful spell. Princess Peronel is safe but the brownies cannot enter the Fairy Land without their goodness. The book, ends on a happy note in typical Enid Blyton style. The King forgives them because of their heroic effort and the brownies get a resounding welcome from the fairy folk.

The language of the book is very simple and captivating and the characters are very endearing. There is never a dull moment and this ensures that the readers remain hooked to the book until the last page is turned.

Just look at the names of people and places, and you will understand why Enid Blyton is regarded as one of the most-loved and celebrated children's authors of all times.






No comments:

Popular Posts